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Old 01-08-2010, 11:35 PM
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My Mazda Millenia/2000 has been parked outside my house for over a week in temperatures Min-12C (feels like -17C) and Max -7/-10. The car starts without any problem.

Since the gas was low I decided to fill it up. When I fill gas in my fuel tank, it overflows and the hose stops as though the tank is full whereas the tank is near empty. I had to keep filling little by little as the fuel hose keeps stoping every few seconds. Managed to fill till $ 10/- worth. The gas guzzles back and tends to overflow as though there is a block. Has anyone any idea what could this be and how to resolve it short of going to a mechanic.


Thanks
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Old 01-09-2010, 12:29 AM
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I feel your pain man!

Your breather tube may be plugged or the actually gas filler pipe is clogged. The only thing I could suggest is some heet or other fuel line antifreeze. Otherwise I don't know. Lets see what someone else knows.
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Old 01-10-2010, 06:51 PM
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For starters, keep in mind that in cold weather, it is a good idea to keep your tank relatively full (overnight, at least). This will minimize moisture condensation in your tank.

I don't know if condensation could be so voluminous as to block your filler or breather tube (a big T drop at some point would have facilitated that), but maybe some of our midwest or high plains US members could comment on that. If it is, it would be prudent to add some gas line antifreeze (methanol) to adsorb moisture and insure you don't develop ignition problems. As a Quebecois, you probably know this already, so excuse me if I am saying something you already know well.

Some cars are quite sensitive to the positioning of the gas nozzle in the filler neck, but I have not noticed this in my Milly. But with your temps, perhaps the hoses on the pump are so stiff as to cause a funny positioning. ?? Good luck.
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Old 01-10-2010, 08:02 PM
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A few questions to start out with.
Is this the first time this has happened?
Have you ever been in a collision where that area was affected?
Did you try another pump/gas station.

The gas pump's nozzle shuts off via a differential in pressure (venturi affect). There are no fancy sensors or complicated parts in the nozzle housing. This doesn't mean they don't go bad but 98% of the time it is your car that is the culprit.

The underside of the nozzle at the very tip is a small vacuum sensing port. If this comes into contact with bubbles or fluid it will trigger the pump to shut off. It's as simple as that.

A few things can happen. If your gas is especially foamy (through additives or temp related) the bubbles in the gas tank will rise enough to hit the tip of nozzle and flip the shut off switch.

If your filler hose is kinked or bent the fill rate will be slower than the pump rate and you will get a build up of gas that will prematurely shut the pump off.
Likewise,
If car is parked on an incline while filling you will also be susceptible to the above.

Solution:
If you find that you see a lot of foam in your gas tank drive your tank to empty and refill at another gas station. It will be beneficial to drop in some gas line antifreeze or injector cleaning at the same time of refilling too.

Next time you fill up pull your nozzle out about 1/2" from where you normally insert it. This will remedy most problems.

If all else fails rotate the filling nozzle about 45 degrees while you fill so that the vacuum sensing port is not in the direct line with the tank fill tube.
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Old 01-12-2010, 09:45 PM
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Quote:
For starters, keep in mind that in cold weather, it is a good idea to keep your tank relatively full (overnight, at least). This will minimize moisture condensation in your tank.

I don't know if condensation could be so voluminous as to block your filler or breather tube (a big T drop at some point would have facilitated that), but maybe some of our midwest or high plains US members could comment on that. If it is, it would be prudent to add some gas line antifreeze (methanol) to adsorb moisture and insure you don't develop ignition problems. As a Quebecois, you probably know this already, so excuse me if I am saying something you already know well.

Some cars are quite sensitive to the positioning of the gas nozzle in the filler neck, but I have not noticed this in my Milly. But with your temps, perhaps the hoses on the pump are so stiff as to cause a funny positioning. ?? Good luck.[/b]
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Old 01-12-2010, 09:46 PM
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Thank you going to try the antifreeze...never had to use it so far. I guess as it was lying for over a week with low gas, must have been some condensation. Thanks.
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Old 01-12-2010, 09:47 PM
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Quote:
A few questions to start out with.
Is this the first time this has happened?
Have you ever been in a collision where that area was affected?
Did you try another pump/gas station.

The gas pump's nozzle shuts off via a differential in pressure (venturi affect). There are no fancy sensors or complicated parts in the nozzle housing. This doesn't mean they don't go bad but 98% of the time it is your car that is the culprit.

The underside of the nozzle at the very tip is a small vacuum sensing port. If this comes into contact with bubbles or fluid it will trigger the pump to shut off. It's as simple as that.

A few things can happen. If your gas is especially foamy (through additives or temp related) the bubbles in the gas tank will rise enough to hit the tip of nozzle and flip the shut off switch.

If your filler hose is kinked or bent the fill rate will be slower than the pump rate and you will get a build up of gas that will prematurely shut the pump off.
Likewise,
If car is parked on an incline while filling you will also be susceptible to the above.

Solution:
If you find that you see a lot of foam in your gas tank drive your tank to empty and refill at another gas station. It will be beneficial to drop in some gas line antifreeze or injector cleaning at the same time of refilling too.

Next time you fill up pull your nozzle out about 1/2" from where you normally insert it. This will remedy most problems.

If all else fails rotate the filling nozzle about 45 degrees while you fill so that the vacuum sensing port is not in the direct line with the tank fill tube.[/b]
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...It takes 8,460 bolts to assemble an automobile, and one nut to scatter it all over the road.
~Author Unknown
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Old 01-12-2010, 09:50 PM
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No never happened before, but yes the first time that I left Milly for about a week on low gas tank out in -10/-20 temperatures...never done this before too. Always kept her in the warm garage....

Yes, I went through your note and will check with the antifreeze and injector cleaning. In fact, I have seen quite a few people use it in the Gas Station, but I never had to use it ever. Shes been super till now. Will give u feed back.

I guess the antifreeze should help the condensation inside the tank. Thanks again.
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Old 01-12-2010, 09:53 PM
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Yes, I realise it...never kept it on low tank especially in freezing temperatures....just a goof up and never had this problem so far. Yes, we take care of it here, but one of those silly slip ups on account of the holidays.
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